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Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine: 2009; 7(6): 527-531
DOI: 10.3736/jcim20090607
Functional brain magnetic resonance imaging in healthy people receiving acupuncture at Waiguan versus Waiguan plus Yanglingquan points: a randomized controlled trial
1. Yong HUANG (School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanfang Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong Province, China )
2. Tian-le LI (School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanfang Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong Province, China )
3. Xin-sheng LAI (Acupuncture and Massage College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510405, Guangdong Province, China E-mail: lai1023@163.com)
4. Yan-qi ZOU (School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanfang Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong Province, China )
5. Jun-xian WU (School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanfang Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, Guangdong Province, China )
6. Chun-zhi TANG (Acupuncture and Massage College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510405, Guangdong Province, China )
7. Jun-jun YANG (Acupuncture and Massage College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510405, Guangdong Province, China )
Objective: To observe the cerebral activating effects of needling at Waiguan (SJ5) versus SJ5 plus Yanglingquan (GB34) points in young healthy volunteers based on the hypothesis of  "needling effect of combined acupuncture points relates to the brain activation".
Methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers were randomly divided into SJ5 group and SJ5 plus GB34 group, and there were 8 volunteers in each group. The volunteers in the two groups received needling at corresponding points on the right hand or foot respectively. Nuclear magnetic resonance (1.5T, GE Corporation) was used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain before and during the needling, and the obtained experimental data in the regional brain were processed and analyzed by the method of region of interest (ROI).
Results: The ROI activation induced by needling of SJ5 or SJ5 plus GB34 was all relatively concentrated (activation rate more than 4 or activation point more than 10) on bilateral frontal and parietal lobes. There were no significant differences in ROI activation rates of brain regions between the two groups. ROI activation points showed that needling at SJ5 could activate the right cerebellum specifically (P<0.05, vs SJ5 plus GB34), while needling at SJ5 plus GB34 could activate the left parietal and occipital lobes and bilateral basal ganglion more effectively than activate the other brain regions (P<0.05, vs SJ5). ROI activation strength showed that needling at SJ5 plus GB34 could more strongly activate the right cerebellum (P<0.05, vs SJ5).
Conclusion: Based on fMRI data, a kind of acupuncture point combination of SJ5 and GB34 within the hand-foot Shaoyang meridians, could improve the motor and sensory dysfunctions and equilibrium disturbance. The effect of combined acupuncture points was proved by cerebral activity initially.
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Please cite this article as:
Huang Y, Li TL, Lai XS, Zou YQ, Wu JX, Tang CZ, Yang JJ. Functional brain magnetic resonance imaging in healthy people receiving acupuncture at Waiguan versus Waiguan plus Yanglingquan points: a randomized controlled trial. J Chin Integr Med / Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao. 2009; 7(6): 527-531.
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