Search JIM Advanced Search

Journal of Integrative Medicine ›› 2019, Vol. 17 ›› Issue (2): 93-99.doi: 10.1016/j.joim.2019.01.001

• Original Clinical Research • Previous Articles     Next Articles

Integrative herbal treatments of diabetes in Beni Mellal region of Morocco

Hanae Naceiri Mrabti a, Nidal Jaradat b, Mohamed Reda Kachmar c, Abdelaziz Ed-Dra d, Abdelilah Ouahbi c, Yahia Cherrah a, Moulay El Abbes Faouzi a   

  1. a Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Pharmacokinetic Team, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Université Mohammed V-Souissi, Rabat 10056, Morocco
    b Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, P.O. Box 7, Palestine
    c Faculty of Sciences, Health and Environment Laboratory, Plant Protection Team, Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, BP 11201-Zitoune, Morocco
    d Faculty of Science, Team of Microbiology and Health, Laboratory of Chemistry-Biology Applied to the Environment, Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, BP 11201-Zitoune, Morocco
  • Received:2018-08-05 Accepted:2018-11-05 Online:2019-03-06 Published:2019-05-17

Objectives
Diabetes is one of the most life-threatening chronic metabolic disorders and is considered a global health problem due to its prevalence and incidence. In Morocco, several herbal preparations are utilized to treat this disease. For this reason, the current study aimed to identify and to collect data about the medicinal plants utilized in folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes in the Beni Mellal region of Morocco.
Methods
An ethnobotanical survey was carried out among 400 herbalists, competent villagers and traditional healers from the Beni Mellal region through direct interviews using a semistructured questionnaire.
Results
Forty-five medicinal plants belonging to 25 families were identified for their use in diabetes treatment. Interview results showed that the most frequently used plants were Olea europaeaSalvia officinalisAllium sativum and Trigonella foenum-graecum, with a relative frequency of citation values of 24.3%, 23.0%, 22.5% and 20.5%, respectively. Moreover, in this study, the Fabaceae family was the most commonly reported plant family, and the leaves and roots were the most commonly used parts, for the treatment of diabetes.
Conclusion
The Beni Mellal region of Morocco has an important floristic biodiversity of plants used to treat diabetes in traditional medicinal practice. This result provides a good database for pharmacological screenings in the search for plant-based antidiabetic medications.

Key words: Integrative medicine, Medicinal plants, Diabetes, Beni Mellal, Morocco, Questionnaire

[1] Brody Slostad, Tejinder Khalsa, Kathleen Young, Hildalicia Guerra, Anjali Bhagra. A case-based approach to integrative medicine for cardiovascular disease prevention. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2020, 18(2): 159-162.
[2] Kayode Ezekiel Adewole. Nigerian antimalarial plants and their anticancer potential: A review. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2020, 18(2): 92-113.
[3] Noriko Shinjyo, James Parkinson, Jimmy Bell, Tatsuro Katsuno, Annie Bligh. Berberine for prevention of dementia associated with diabetes and its comorbidities: A systematic review. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2020, 18(2): 125-151.
[4] Dona Nirmani Ann Wijewickrama Samarakoon, Deepthi Inoka Uluwaduge, Malith Aravinda Siriwardhene. Mechanisms of action of Sri Lankan herbal medicines used in the treatment of diabetes: A review. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2020, 18(1): 13-20.
[5] Yogesh Subhash Biradar, Swathi Bodupally, Harish Padh. Evaluation of antiplasmodial properties in 15 selected traditional medicinal plants from India. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2020, 18(1): 80-85.
[6] Mohadeseh Ostovar, Abolfazl Akbari, Mohammad Hossein Anbardar, Aida Iraji, Mohsen Salmanpour, Salar Hafez Ghoran, Mojtaba Heydari, Mesbah Shams. Effects of Citrullus colocynthis L. in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2020, 18(1): 59-67.
[7] Pranay Soni, Rajesh Choudhary, Surendra H. Bodakhe. Effects of a novel isoflavonoid from the stem bark of Alstonia scholaris against fructose-induced experimental cataract. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2019, 17(5): 374-382.
[8] Shipra Shah, Jahangeer A. Bhat. Ethnomedicinal knowledge of indigenous communities and pharmaceutical potential of rainforest ecosystems in Fiji Islands. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2019, 17(4): 244-249.
[9] Mohammad Hossein Ayati, Ata Pourabbasi, Nazli Namazi, Arman Zargaran, Zahra Kheiry, Amir Hooman Kazemi, Bagher Larijani. The necessity for integrating traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine into medical education curricula in Iran. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2019, 17(4): 296-301.
[10] Syed Kashif, Rema Razdan, Ramanaiah Illuri. Potential of phloroglucinol to improve erectile dysfunction associated with streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2019, 17(4): 282-287.
[11] Mikhail Teppone. Medicine has always been “Modern” and “Scientific” from ancient times to the present day. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2019, 17(4): 229-237.
[12] Baxter Blonk, Ian E. Cock. Interactive antimicrobial and toxicity profiles of Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd. extracts with conventional antimicrobials. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2019, 17(4): 261-272.
[13] Tamer Aboushanab, Mohamed Khalil, YaserAl Ahmari. The present state of complementary medicine regulation in Saudi Arabia. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2019, 17(3): 147-149.
[14] Fung-Kei Cheng. An overview of the contribution of acupuncture to thyroid disorders. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2018, 16(6): 375-383.
[15] Mehranghiz Ebrahimi-Mameghani, Mohammad Asghari-Jafarabadi, Khatereh Rezazadeh. TCF7L2-rs7903146 polymorphism modulates the effect of artichoke leaf extract supplementation on insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 2018, 16(5): 329-334.
Viewed
Full text


Abstract

Cited

  Shared   
  Discussed   
[1] Wei-xiong Liang. Problems-solving strategies in clinical treatment guideline for traditional Chinese medicine and integrative medicine. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 1-4
[2] Zhao-guo Li. Discussion on English translation of commonly used sentences in traditional Chinese medicine: part one. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 107-110
[3] Jun Hu, Jian-ping Liu. Non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headache. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 31
[4] Jun Cai, Hua Wang, Sheng Zhou, Bin Wu, Hua-rong Song, Zheng-rong Xuan. Effect of Sijunzi Decoction and enteral nutrition on T-cell subsets and nutritional status in patients with gastric cancer after operation: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 37-40
[5] Zhi-chun Jin. Problems in establishing clinical guideline for integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 5-8
[6] Wei Zhang, Xiang-feng Lu, Xiao-mei Zhang, Jian-jun Wu, Liang-duo Jiang. A rat model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by infusing bleomycin quickly through tracheal intubation. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 60-67
[7] Guo-hong Yuan, Xiao-jing Pang, He-chao Ma. Synergic effects of Danggui Buxue Decoction in reducing toxicity of cytoxan in tumor-bearing mice. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 83-88
[8] Li Zhou, Hong-xing Zhang, Ling-guang Liu, Wen-jun Wan. Effect of electro-acupuncture at Fenglong (GV 16) on nitric oxide and endothelin in rats with hyperlipidemia. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 89-92
[9] Jin-zhou Tian, Jing Shi, Xin-qing Zhang, Qi Bi, Xin Ma, Zhi-liang Wang, Xiao-bin Li, Shu-li Shen, Lin Li, Zhen-yun Wu, Li-yan Fang, Xiao-dong Zhao, Ying-chun Miao, Peng-wen Wang, Ying Ren, Jun-xiang Yin, Yong-yan Wang, Beijing United Study Group on MCI of the Capital Foundation of Medical Developments. Guiding principles of clinical research on mild cognitive impairment (protocol). Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2008, 6(1): 9-14
[10] Bo Wang , Wei Yan , Li-hui Hou, Xiao-ke Wu. Disorder of Tiangui (kidney essence) and reproductive dysfunction in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine, 2010, 8(11): 1018-1022